Horatio Alger

Horatio Alger, Jr. (1834-99) was a prolific writer of dime novel stories for boys. From the debut of his first novel, Ragged Dick, in 1867, Alger was instrumental in establishing a new genre of dime novels known as the 'city story.' The genre arose out of the wide-spread urbanization that followed the Civil War and paralleled the rise of industrialism. Alger's stories heroicized the young street urchins living in poverty among large, urban centers such as New York, Boston, and Philadelphia. With uncommon courage and moral fortitude, Alger's youths struggle against adversity to achieve great wealth and acclaim. These rags to riches stories were enormously popular with the public and flourished in the decades from 1870 to 1890.

Alger's stories continued to be reprinted well after his death, as evidenced by this 1911 issue of Boy's Home Weekly. Alger's name appears twice on the cover, its prominence pointing to the author's continued popularity and the importance of a famous writer's reputation for increasing a publication's circulation.