Frank Merriwell's Limit

Correspondence.

L. C. D., Burger, Me.-No premium on the dime of 1827.

W. C. K. Buffalo, N. Y.-1. Write for catalogue. 2. No.

C. S., New York City.-The periodical mentioned is out of print.

C. H., Elizabethport, N. J.-Apply to some printer. We do not do work of that description,

R. F. B., Tower City, Pa.-No premium on the half-dollar of 1824.

Jenke, Newton, Mass.-Walking and cycling will probably bring about the desired result.

W. H. S. Watkins, N.Y.-No premium on the half-dollar of 1824.

L. H., Brockwayville, Pa.-The Merriwell stories are founded upon fact.

A. E. Y., San Francisco, Cal.-Yes, No.66 is in print.

M. S. Pittsburgh, Pa.-Your story has been forwarded to Mr. Standish.

C. J., Atlantic City, N. J.-No premium on either of the coins, which are, properly speaking, tokens.

J. M. P. Mercersburg, Pa.-Your letter has been sent to Mr. Standish, and he will give it due consideration.

W. F. G. B., Nazareth, Pa.-1. The copper cent 1798 is worth ten cents; that of 1810 is worth three cents. No premium on the other coins.

A. C., Cincinnati, Ohio.-Squeeze out the blackheads and put on a little vaseline. Your handwriting is good.

G.W., Bradford, Pa.-I. Your English coin is probably a five- shilling piece, worth about a dollar and quarter. 2. No premium. 3. Yes.

H. W.. Keokuk, Ia.-West Point is for the army alone. Write to Col. O. H. Ernst, Superintendent West Point Military Academy. West Point, N. Y.

P. J., Binghamton. N. Y.-1. You can obtain what you desire from the Scott Coin and Stamp Co., 23d st., New York City. 2. For business reasons.

J. R. E. D., Munhall, Pa.-We do not think they are published. Write to the commander of the School- St. Mary, New York City.

A. T., Sherman, Texas.-No premium on the dime Of 1839. Write what you desire to the Scott Coin and Stamp Co., 23d st., New York City.

J. L. M. Rochester, N.Y.-Do you mean the wagons used by contractors? Write again, more explicitly.

W. Y. C., Merrick, Mass.-Address imply Superintendent of the Charlestown Navy Yard. Boston. Mass.

Trailer Aurora, Mo.-1. We know nothing of the periodical mentioned 2. You are somewhat below the average, both in weight and height. 3. A good play is a distinct educator.

Y. E. S., New York City.-Your height and weight for a girl of your age seem to us just right. We will consider your suggestion. Persevere with your French. You will not regret it.

L. C. W., Minneapolis, Minn.-You are below the average in height, but there is plenty of time to grow. Use light-weight dumb-bells and Indian Clubs.

C. D. J., Cleveland, Ohio-The half-cent of 1853 is worth five cents.

L. D. R., Portsmouth. N. TI.-You will find the following box measure very useful; A box sixteen by sixteen and one-eighth inches square an eight inches deep, will contain a bushel, or 2,150.4 cubic inches, each inch in depth holding one gallon. A box twenty-four by eleven and one-fifth inches square and eight inches deep will also contain a bushel or 2,150.4 cubic inches, each inch in depth holding one gallon. A box twelve by eleven and one-fifth inches square and eight inches deep will contain half a bushel, or 1,075.2 cubic inches, each inch in depth holding half a gallon. A box eight by eight and one- fourth inches will contain half a peck, or 298.8 cubic inches. The gallon dry measure. A box four by four inches square and four and one- fifth inches deep will contain one quart, or 67.2 cubic inches.

Home Browse Other Texts Full Text Search Table of Contents for This Issue Previous Section Next Section
Home Browse Other Texts Full Text Search Table of Contents for This Issue Previous Section Next Section