The Games
(in alphabetical order,
according to game title)

1-AC
AD-AZ
B-BE
BI-BY
C-CL
CO-CY
D-DI
DJ-DU
E
F-FI
FL-FU
GA-GL

GO-GY
H
I
J
K
L
M-ME
MI-MY
N
O
P-PI
PL-PY
Q
R-RE
RH-RY
S-SH
SI-SO
SP-SS
ST
SU-SY
T-TI
TO-TY
U
V
WA-WH
WI-WW
X-Z

 

The Stephen M. Cabrinety Collection in the History of Microcomputing at Stanford University consists of several thousands of pieces of computer hardware and software. Dating primarily from the 1980s and 1990s, the collection chronicles the formative era of personal computing, specifically computer gaming.

This site describes the videogame portion of the collection, which documents the rise of computer games, with a focus on games for Atari, Commodore, Amiga, Sega, Nintendo, and Apple systems. The site includes a full listing (left) of the computer games in the collection, some of which are linked to scans (available shortly) of their entire original documentation (box, manual, etc.).

The collection is held by the Department of Special Collections of the Stanford University Libraries.


 

Scope & Content

About Stephen M. Cabrinety - A brief biography of the donor.

Links to videogame-related resources at Stanford University:

Other related resources at Stanford:

A few external links to history of gaming related pages:

  • "History of Computer Graphics (CG)", a timeline by Terrence Masson for the Visual Effects Resource Center.
  • videogames.coms History of Video Games Article by Videogames.com offers a history of video games from 1971 to the present. Includes prehistory and related links.
  • Review Palace's Gaming History Article written in 1998 profiles classic gaming consoles such as the Atari and Intellivision and offers details on game emulators
  • I.C. When Donald A. Thomas, Jr provides an extensive resource for classic video and computer games history including articles and a timeline.
  • History of Home Video Games Homepage Web directory to sites for games consoles past and present. View by year from 1972, or by console name.
  • VIDEOTOPIA Official site for this traveling museum exhibit chronicling the history of mankinds first interactive media - the video game.
 

You will neeed Adobe Acrobat Reader
(at least version 3.01)
to view these pages.
The Acrobat Reader is available from the
Free Adobe Acrobat Reader Software page.


Site created and maintained by Colyn Wohlmut, Stanford University.